Almond Biscotti With Vin Santo And TBA

On saturday I was having a dinner with my wife and some friends. A 3-course menu. For dessert we had almond biscotti and because I was unsure with what wine to pair them I asked you, my readers, in my last post what wine you would pair with them. Fellow blogger Talkavino suggested an aged TBA (Trocken Beren Auslese) whereas Stefano from Clicks & Corks and Julian from  Vino In Love recommended to pair the almond biscotti with vin santo, a sweet wine from Italy.

Because I couldn’t decide between the two wines I decided to buy a bottle of each. I also never had a TBA before so that was another reason for me to buy both wines.

Almond biscotti are a cookies that are especially popular in Italy. Julian and Stenfao pointed out in their recommendation that the traditional pairing with these Tuscan biscotti is vin santo. If you are not familiar with what vin santo is then let me redirect you to this post from Julian which explains quite well the origins of that wine.

The two wines I picked to pair with the biscotti were: 2004 San Felice Vin Santo del Chianti Classico from Tuscany and 2001 Hopler Trocken Beren Auslese from Austria. I wanted to buy a TBA from Germany but the stores that I went to didn’t seem to carry any.

Hopler’s TBA comes from Austria’s Brugenland region and is a blend of 50% Samling, 30% Chardonnay and 20% Gruner Veltliner. To be honest I was not familiar with the Samling grape before trying this TBA. Have you tried any wines from Samling before? Let’s move on to my tasting notes for the Hopler TBA.

In the glass, the wine has a golden-yellow color. On the nose, intense aromas of apricot, honey, cloves and caramelized oranges. In the mouth, quite sweet, very smooth with notes of apricots. The finish is extremely long. Highly recommended but also quite expensive. The 0.375 liters bottle sells for around $100. Luckily we were only 4 people otherwise one bottle wouldn’t have been enough..

But fortunately I also bought that San Felice vin santo. A 0.375 liters bottle retails for around $25. The vin santo is produced with 75% Trebbiano and 25% Malvasia grapes that are planted in the Chianti area of Tuscany. Here are my tasting notes for it.

In the glass, the wine has an amber golden color. The nose is not very intense but there are a soft aromas of dried fruit, hazelnuts and almonds. In the mouth, acid but also sweet. Reminds me a lot of mead. Lingering finish.

All in all the vin santo did not taste as good as the TBA but the vin santo paired better with the biscotti than the TBA did. The TBA is “too good” for any dessert but the vin santo worked just fine.

That’s all for today! Have a good sunday evening folks!

Advertisements

10 thoughts on “Almond Biscotti With Vin Santo And TBA

  1. Thanks for the shout out! I didn’t mean to get you you into such an expense, and I’m not familiar with TBA from Austria – but I’m glad you enjoyed it : )

  2. Hi Frank, thank you for the kind mention 🙂
    Don’t give up just yet on vin santo and if you have the opportunity perhaps try a few more from other producers (like Castello di Volpaia, Casa Sola, Felsina, Villa Calcinaia…): they may make you happier 🙂
    Take care

    • Thank you for recommending vin santo with the almond biscotti. Even though the vin santo wasn’t my favorite it paired extremely well with the biscotti.
      I will take a look at the recommendations and see if I can find some at the local wine shops. Thanks Stefano 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s